Loft Conversion Designs – A Beginner’s Guide to Loft Conversions

 

Loft Conversion Designs

Loft Conversion Designs – There seem to be a lot of difficult steps to getting your loft converted, so knowing where to start can feel discouraging. But fear not, Athtech Designs are here to help make the process feel easier to manage. In this blog, we’ll explain the key stages of loft conversions and explain what you need to consider each step of the way. 

SO CAN MY LOFT BE CONVERTED? 
Prior to construction, you must ensure your house is suitable for a loft conversion. Most homes come with Permitted Development requirements, which give the owner recommendations of what they can and can’t do. If you are looking to go exceed the Permitted Development that is placed on the house, you will need to get further information from your council or seek help from an architect & engineer. Before you go asking around, there are a few checks you can make yourself. 

IS BUILDING REGULATION APPROVAL REQUIRED? 
Building regulations approval is required to convert a loft into a habitable space. 

WHAT TYPE OF LOFT CONVERSION SHOULD CAN I HAVE?

There are three main types of loft conversions: Dormer, roof light, and hip-to-gable. The one you choose is likely to be determined by a number of factors, including the age and type of house you live in, and also your budget. 

Roof light conversions 

A roof light conversion is when you build within the existing roofline or pitch of your home, so you don’t extend the space externally at all.

Dormers 

The most common loft conversion is in the style of a dormer loft conversion. These are the most popular for several reasons, one being that the conversion is simply an extension of the existing roof. They also add much more additional floor and headspace within the newly converted room, generally becoming the largest room within your home. 

Hip-to-gable 

A hip to gable loft conversion is a popular option for many semi-detached or detached homes with a hipped roof, which is essentially a roof with a sloping side in addition to the slopes at the front and back. 

STREET SCENE 

If there are one or more loft conversions that have been carried out on your street, it’s most likely that you will be able to do something similar. It may be worthwhile asking a neighbour to have a look at theirs to see what can be doable for your home. 

SEE WHAT TYPE OF ROOF DO YOU HAVE 

Some roof shapes and forms lend themselves more readily to conversion than others. The key factors to assess are the roof shape, its internal height and width and the pitch, or angle of the roof. 

HEADROOM
When evaluating the potential of your loft for conversion, we must measure the space where there is a clear headroom of 2m – 2.1m or more between the joists and rafters. Once the floor has been built up and the roof insulated, this will leave you with around 1.9m – 2m of headroom, which is the minimum practical ceiling height.

THE FLOOR BENEATH 
 When planning a loft conversion, it may be worth having a plan of what changes are likely to be made the floor below. Have a look to see where the stairs could be placed. Even a well-designed staircase can take up a lot of space, so make sure you’re prepared to lose whichever part of the room below. 

Get in contact today to see how we can help! Athech Designs 

 

The difference between ‘Planning Permission’ and ‘Building Regs’ drawings

There are two stages to architectural drawings for your extension to get approved: ‘Planning Permission’ and ‘Building Regs’. 

Planning Permission Drawings are the initial designs and outline brief for the build. These drawings are primarily used to present the proposal to the local Planning Authority to seek permission. Planning permission drawings are not as detailed as the subsequent Building Regs drawings, which come later, once you have acquired planning approval. 

On smaller projects, the construction may be simple and straightforward enough to not require Building Regs construction drawings. A proficient builder could work from Planning Permission Drawings, and get any questions they need answering on-site by the client. They will use their experience and knowledge to construct the building using the designs presented in the Planning Permission Drawings. This method is called a ‘Building Notice’; all the builder would require is to appoint a structural engineer if calculations were needed by Building Control for more complex design features.

The difference between ‘Planning Permission’ and ‘Building Regs’ drawings

 

If the building is more complex, then Building Regs construction drawings will be required. These will detail out how the building will be constructed. They will include information on material sizes such as; timber and steel; weather-proofing; insulation thickness; critical intersections etc. They take a considerable amount of time, knowledge and attention to produce.

A duty of care has to be taken to ensure that all work on-site is achievable, safe and to the right standard. A structural engineer will also need to provide calculations and sizes for any steel beams, timber, masonry piers, and foundations that need to be designed and included in the ‘Building Regulation’ information pack. These drawings can then be used to obtain accurate quotes from builders, and be used as a plan to construct the build.

The difference between ‘Planning Permission’ and ‘Building Regs’ drawings 2
Loft Conversion Designs - A Beginner’s Guide to Loft Conversions

Get in contact today to see how we can help! Athech Designs 

 

The difference between ‘Planning Permission’ and ‘Building Regs’ drawings

There are two stages to architectural drawings for your extension to get approved: ‘Planning Permission’ and ‘Building Regs’. 

Planning Permission Drawings are the initial designs and outline brief for the build. These drawings are primarily used to present the proposal to the local Planning Authority to seek permission. Planning permission drawings are not as detailed as the subsequent Building Regs drawings, which come later, once you have acquired planning approval. 

On smaller projects, the construction may be simple and straightforward enough to not require Building Regs construction drawings. A proficient builder could work from Planning Permission Drawings, and get any questions they need answering on-site by the client. They will use their experience and knowledge to construct the building using the designs presented in the Planning Permission Drawings. This method is called a ‘Building Notice’; all the builder would require is to appoint a structural engineer if calculations were needed by Building Control for more complex design features.

The difference between ‘Planning Permission’ and ‘Building Regs’ drawings

 

If the building is more complex, then Building Regs construction drawings will be required. These will detail out how the building will be constructed. They will include information on material sizes such as; timber and steel; weather-proofing; insulation thickness; critical intersections etc. They take a considerable amount of time, knowledge and attention to produce.

A duty of care has to be taken to ensure that all work on-site is achievable, safe and to the right standard. A structural engineer will also need to provide calculations and sizes for any steel beams, timber, masonry piers, and foundations that need to be designed and included in the ‘Building Regulation’ information pack. These drawings can then be used to obtain accurate quotes from builders, and be used as a plan to construct the build.

The difference between ‘Planning Permission’ and ‘Building Regs’ drawings 2
Loft Conversion Designs - A Beginner’s Guide to Loft Conversions

Get in contact today to see how we can help! Athech Designs 

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